Copyright for games developers

The games industry relies on copyright to protect its product. Without copyright, it cannot be certain of getting paid. If you have read the page on copyright, then you will understand that protecting your rights is not an easy matter. Give BRAND PROTECT a call to discuss your requirements. Some of the issues that may be of concern to you could include:

  • Ways to protect your source code;
  • Developing the game;
  • Ensuring the game is put on the market and that you get the reward/paid;
  • Developing the game in your private time – is my employer entitled to the copyright in the game;
  • Developing the game at work, can you get the recognition you deserve?

For a quick and effective way of protecting your source code, have a look at the case study on this page below. If finance is an issue, then give BRAND PROTECT a call. Many of our clients invest in ventures and they may be able to help you. Have a look at our “Helpful Hints” page. If you are developing the next “DOOM” at home and you are a programmer for a games company, you need to know what you can do and what you should avoid. Give BRAND PROTECT a call and discuss the issues in confidence. If becoming the next Sid Mayer is your ambition then you should know that the Copyright Act specifically excludes programmers the right to be known as the author of the software. With this in mind, you have an opportunity to negotiate with your employer to have your contribution recognised. Perhaps some advice is needed before you “sound off” prematurely? IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR A JOB IN THE GAMES INDUSTRY, TRY THE WEBSITE OF SOME GREAT RECRUITMENT SPECIALISTS IN LONDON CALLED DATASCOPE – (ASK FOR JULIEN) www.datascope.co.uk


Case Studies

Brand Protect is often asked to advise clients who suspect that their software has been used by a competitor.

One such company developed a software product and was in the process of having it Beta tested by a “partner” company.  This “partner” inspirationally produced a very similar software product as if by “immaculate conception”.

Brand Protect obtained a copy of the “partner’s” rival version of the software.  The software had been written in C++.  A line by line analysis of the two products proved that the “partner” had used not only operative source code but had also taken redundant routines and operations which had not been removed by our client (we are told that developers are not as tidy as they used to be – but who are we to judge?)

We confronted our client’s now previous “partner” with this evidence of copying and obtained for our client the removal from the market place of the competitive software as well as a substantial sum by way of compensation.

The moral of the story is consult BRAND PROTECT if you suspect that someone else is using your software.  Even if you do not, give us a call to ensure that you benefit from our expertise in software development protection and that you continue to benefit.